collegiate-deviance:

Leonardo DiCaprio cut his hand while the cameras were rolling on the set of Django Unchained and kept moving through the scene, never breaking character, and  his real-life bloodied hand made it into the final version of the film. During one take of that scene, DiCaprio unintentionally slammed his hand into glass, creating a gash that later required stitches. But that didn’t stop him from doing his job. As his hand bled quite visibly, DiCaprio kept going, even using the hand as a new dramatic prop. At one point he smears his bloodied hand over Broomhilda’s face in an act of evil dominance. And Broomhilda (Kerry Washington) looks horrified as he does it. (Perhaps Washington wasn’t acting!) And that was the take that director Quentin Tarantino kept in the film. (Source)

jarjarbinkzz:

After discovering a pile of corpses at the scene of the Uruk-hai massacre in The Two Towers, Viggo Mortensen kicked an Orc’s helmet in rage and broke two of his toes; which is part of the reason why he falls to his knees, crying out.

“Normally, an actor would yell ‘Ow!’ if they hurt themselves,” said Peter Jackson. “Viggo turned a broken toe into a performance.”

(via downeying)

annakendrick:

Les Mis’s rotten reviews aren’t just bad

they’re fucking brutal

Frank Capra’s ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’, 1946.

(via missavagardner)

Cianfrance was adamant not to let production designers dig the hole for Ryan in the scene where Dean is burying his dog. Ryan dug it himself and an hour and a half later, “when he was done digging the hole, he broke down. And that was an unscripted scene, him crying at the table. He was actually so emotional and what he told me afterwards was that, that process tricked his body because his body was so exhausted and his body didn’t know that that wasn’t his dog. His body just buried his dog, and his body reacted in that way.”

The day after Columbine, I was interviewed for the Tom Brokaw news program. The reporter had been assigned a theory and was seeking sound bites to support it. “Wouldn’t you say,” she asked, “that killings like this are influenced by violent movies?” No, I said, I wouldn’t say that. “But what about Basketball Diaries?” she asked. “Doesn’t that have a scene of a boy walking into a school with a machine gun?” The obscure 1995 Leonardo Di Caprio movie did indeed have a brief fantasy scene of that nature, I said, but the movie failed at the box office (it grossed only $2.5 million), and it’s unlikely the Columbine killers saw it. The reporter looked disappointed, so I offered her my theory.

“Events like this,” I said, “if they are influenced by anything, are influenced by news programs like your own. When an unbalanced kid walks into a school and starts shooting, it becomes a major media event. Cable news drops ordinary programming and goes around the clock with it. The story is assigned a logo and a theme song; these two kids were packaged as the Trench Coat Mafia. The message is clear to other disturbed kids around the country: If I shoot up my school, I can be famous. The TV will talk about nothing else but me. Experts will try to figure out what I was thinking. The kids and teachers at school will see they shouldn’t have messed with me. I’ll go out in a blaze of glory.

In short, I said, events like Columbine are influenced far less by violent movies than by CNN, the NBC Nightly News and all the other news media, who glorify the killers in the guise of “explaining” them. I commended the policy at the Sun-Times, where our editor said the paper would no longer feature school killings on Page 1. The reporter thanked me and turned off the camera. Of course the interview was never used. They found plenty of talking heads to condemn violent movies, and everybody was happy.

actually okay last-last post but Roger Ebert is a cool dude and this is the point I’m trying to make here (via guuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuh)

I feel like I’m eight hours late to the party but I just saw that Marion was nominated for a Golden Globe and so was Daniel 

time to cry